Most, if not all, of Tennessee’s exemptions are limited to
“citizens” “permanently residing” in Tennessee. “Personal
property to the aggregate value of four thousand dollars
($4,000) debtor's equity interest shall be exempt from
execution, seizure or attachment in the hands or possession of
any person who is a bona fide citizen permanently residing in
Tennessee . . ..” Tenn. Code Ann. § 26-2-103. “In addition to
the exemption set out in § 26-2-105, there shall be further
exempt to every resident debtor the following specific articles
of personalty . . ..” Tenn. Code Ann. § 26-2-104. “In addition to
the property exempt under § 26-2-103, the following shall be
exempt from execution, seizure or attachment in the hands or
possession of any person who is a bona fide citizen
permanently residing in Tennessee . . ..” Tenn. Code Ann. §
26-2-111. “The personal property exemptions as provided for
in this part, and the other exemptions as provided in other
sections of the Tennessee Code Annotated for the citizens of
Tennessee, are hereby declared adequate . . ..” Tenn. Code.
Ann. § 26-2-112. “Should a bona fide citizen permanently
residing in Tennessee become a judgment debtor, such debtor
must exercise the exemption as provided in § 26-2-103 by
filing a list of all the items owned . . ..” Tenn. Code Ann. § 26-2-
114.

This state permits only its residents to use its exemptions.  
Therefore, if it is the applicable state (as determined by the
method stated on the home page of this site), its exemptions
may be used only if the debtor is a resident of this state on the
date of filing bankruptcy.